Nelson, B.C.’S 2018 ELEPHANT MOUNTAIN LITERARY FESTIVAL offers West Kootenay book clubs a ticket price break, chance to meet with festival authors

Lorna Goodison

Nelson, B.C.’s Elephant Mountain Literary Festival is offering West Kootenay book club members discounted tickets to the 2018 event and a chance for their club to meet with one of the festival’s invited authors.

“If your book club is registered with us,” said EMLF executive director Natasha Smith, “your members receive a 10 per cent discount on the 2018 Festival Gold Pass which admits the holder to all festival events.” The 2018 festival will run from July 11 to 15, with a regular Gold Pass priced at $70.

Book clubs can register by contacting Smith at emlf@emlfestival.com Club members who are interested in receiving occasional updates about visiting writers, events, and festival programming are also welcome to contact Smith. “We are interested in input from book clubs about the festival, as well,” Smith said. “Feedback is an invaluable help as we put our program together.”

Some clubs, Smith said, have requested that the festival post a list of books by forthcoming festival presenters. Books by confirmed 2018 EMLF presenters are now listed on the EMLF website under the Read On tab: www.emlfestival.com/read-on/

EMLF showcases writers and other literary professionals from the West Kootenay as well as from the larger national community. Confirmed presenters this year include current Jamaica poet laureate Lorna Goodison. Her prose memoir Harvey River: A Memory of My Mother and Her People won the 2008 $40,000 B.C. Award for Canadian Nonfiction. Appearing with her will be her husband J. Edward Chamberlin, an expert on narrative and an aboriginal land claims activist on several continents. His 2003 book If This Is Your Land, Where Are Your Stories? was shortlisted for both the Charles Taylor Prize and the Pearson Writers’ Trust Nonfiction Prize. The couple live on B.C.’s Sunshine Coast.

J. Edward Chamberlin

This year Elephant Mountain Literary Festival is also offering two prizes for book clubs, Smith said. The first is an opportunity for a book club to meet personally with their chosen festival presenter. To compete for this special session with an author, a club submits a 500-word maximum anecdote involving their club. The winning club then picks which presenting author they would like to meet with during the author’s time in Nelson.

The second prize offered, Smith said, is one free Gold Pass issued to the club with the most original or creative name.

 

Deadline for submissions is March 1, 2018, with submissions sent to emlf@emlfestival.com


SOME BOOKS BY
2018 ELEPHANT MOUNTAIN LITERARY FESTIVAL PRESENTERS


Susan Musgrave

Nonfiction

You’re in Canada Now . . . (2005)

A Taste of Haida Gwaii: Food Gathering and Feasting at the Edge of the World (2015

Poetry

When the World is not Our Home: Selected Poems 1985-2000 (2009)

Origami Dove (2011)

Fiction

Cargo of Orchids (2000)

Given (2012)

For Children

Love You More (2014)

More Blueberries! (2015)

Edited

Perfectly Secret (2004)

Force Field: 77 Women Poets of B.C. (2013)

Stephen Reid

Nonfiction

A Crowbar in the Buddhist Garden: Writing from Prison (2012)

Fiction

Jackrabbit Parole (1986)

J. Edward Chamberlin:

Nonfiction:

Come Back To Me My Language: Poetry and the West Indies (1993)

A Covenant in Wonder With the World: The Power of Stories and Songs (2012)

Horse: How the Horse Has Shaped Civilizations (2006)

Island: How Islands Transform the World (2013)

If This Is Your Land, Where Are Your Stories? Finding Common Ground (2003

Family history:

The Banker and the Blackfoot: A Memoir of My Grandfather in Chinook Country (2016)

Lorna Goodison:

Poetry:

Collected Poems (2017)

Controlling the Silver (2005)

I Am Becoming My Mother (1986)

Supplying Salt and Light (2013)

Short stories:

By Love Possessed (2011)

Fool-Fool Rose Is Leaving Labour-in-Vain Savannah (2005

Family history:

Harvey River: A Memory of My Mother and Her People (2007)

Jordan Abel:

Poetry:

The Place of Scraps (2013)

Un/inhabited (2015)

Injun (2016)

Sean Arthur Joyce:

Nonfiction:

A Perfect Childhood: One Hundred Years of Heritage Homes in Nelson (1997)

Hanging Fire & Heavy Horses: A History of Public Transit in Nelson (2000)

Laying the Children’s Ghosts to Rest: Canada’s Home Children in the West (2014)

Poetry:

The Charlatans of Paradise (2005)

Star Seeds( 2009)

The Price of Transcendence( 2015)

A Legacy of Words: remembering Holley Rubinsky

by Anne DeGrace
This article appeared in the fall 2015 issue of ARTiculate Magazine. Each year the Elephant Mountain Literary Festival offers the Holley Rubinsky Memorial Blue Pencil Sessions, this year with Writer-in-Residence Susan Musgrave.

BanffPublishingWorkshop

L – R: Richard Lemm, Alistair MacLeod, Holley Rubinsky, Sandra Birdsell at the Banff Publishing Workshop c. 1982.

In Holley Rubinsky’s 2006 novel Beyond This Point, five women find their way to the Kaslo-like town of Ruth during forest fire season.

Holley passed away in Kaslo from cancer on August 1, and in the smoky weeks that followed I thought about the novel, and I thought about Holley. As word spread in the writing community, I suspect that a lot of people were thinking about the fire that was Holley: in her writing, her energy and enthusiasm, her generosity, and her legendary straightforwardness.

In her four published books of fiction Holley displayed a talent for describing complex ideas with a remarkable economy of words. Her style was sophisticated, insightful, sharply drawn and starkly rendered. Her stories could be humorous, difficult, dark, and unforgettable.

Holley moved from California to Kaslo with her daughter Robin in 1976. By then she had won the Samuel Goldwyn Creative Writing Award, acquired a Master’s degree in education and earned her pilot’s license. In Kaslo she taught elementary school and became entrenched in the community. And she wrote.

Attending the Banff Publishing Workshop (BPW) in the early 80s, Holley rubbed shoulders with literary luminaries including Alistair MacLeod, Sandra Birdsell, and W.O. Mitchell. It was there that she met and fell in love with BPW founder Yuri Rubinsky; they married in 1984. And she became friends with Douglas Gibson, who with McClelland & Stewart would publish Beyond This Point 30 years later.

BPW “changed the face of Canadian publishing” explains Doug. “Yuri lured us all out there, where the mountains had an extraordinary effect of everyone. Just as it was wonderful to see Yuri in action, it was even more wonderful to see Yuri and Holley in action. They were wonderfully well suited, and it was exciting to be around them.”

They settled in Toronto, where Holley went on to win the National Magazine Award, the Foundation Award for Fiction, and the Journey Prize for her short story “Rapid Transits,” which became the title story in a collection published by Polestar in 1991. At First I Hope for Rescue (Knopf 1997) was nominated for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize.

After Yuri’s untimely death, which Holley drew upon for Beyond This Point, she moved to Arizona. There she gathered the characters and setting that would inform South of Elfrida, published by Brindle & Glass in 2013. But the mountains called, and Holley returned to Kaslo where she found new ways to embrace the literary life.

Holley hosted The Writers’ Show on Kootenay Co-op Radio from 2006 to 2008, interviewing writers and publishing insiders. The list is a who’s who of literary notables, including George Bowering, John Vaillant, Angie Abdou, and Kathy Page. She hosted writing retreats at her Kaslo home, offering support, mentorship and critique, drawing gratitude and occasionally blood; Holley said what she thought. Linda Crosfield describes Holley’s retreats:

“A typical retreat consisted of five or six writers working manuscripts. We’d meet in the morning around her big oak table, share a little of our work and talk about what we planned to do over the next few days. Then we’d go to our various work places and have at it. At the end of the day we’d wind up in her kitchen, put together a communal meal, and unwind over a glass of something,” says Linda, adding that Holley was “an insightful editor and a tireless supporter of emerging writers.”

Holley worked with Mandy Bath on her memoir Disaster in Paradise. “Holley was an exacting and inspiring teacher. Her advice was clear, blunt and sometimes hard to take, but always worth following,” she says. “Our collaboration over more than two years marked one of the most fulfilling periods of my life.”

Author Rita Moir taught writing workshops with Holley, who, she says, “was as brutal with her own work as she was with others. Holley was also exuberant, full of piss and vinegar, generous, always inventing new ways to survive. She was curious, a sprite, a vixen, a hag. I mean that in all the fullness of those terms, for the best and the worst.”

If Holley demanded the best in others, she expected the best in herself. Unhappy with the published version of Beyond This Point, she reworked and self-published her own limited edition version, Weight of the Bear. Self-critical as she may have been, her work drew praise. The Globe and Mail called her writing “incendiary.”

“As with all her writing, Holley was fearless about her material and about showing the prickly, mean and miserable side of humanity,” says author Caroline Woodward. “It takes courage to write with such depth about darkness the way she did and with such clear-eyed compassion for each and every character.”

“I was struck by Holley’s fierceness in arguing for good writing,” says poet Jane Byers, and Holley will be remembered for championing the written word.

It was important to Holley that literary mentorship and critique continue. And so, thanks to a generous bequest, Nelson’s Elephant Mountain Literary Festival will host a Holley Rubinsky blue pencil intensive workshop with an established writer in 2016.

The legacy of a writer lies in the words she leaves behind. In Holley’s case, the legacy can be found not only in her own words, but also in the words she drew from others, sometimes gently, sometimes kicking and screaming, demanding always that the work be the very best. And that’s a legacy indeed.

Holley Rubinsky bibliography:

South of Elfrida (Brindle & Glass 2013)
Weight of the Bear (self-published limited edition, 2008; a shortened and edited version of Beyond This Point.)
Beyond This Point (McClelland & Stewart, 2006)
At First I Hope for Rescue (Knopf Canada, 1997; Picador (USA), 1998)
Rapid Transits and Other Stories (Polestar Press, 1990)