BOOK LAUNCH, READINGS, MUSICAL PERFORMANCE TUESDAY, MAY 1 MARK 34 YEARS SINCE THE CLOSURE OF NELSON, BC’s DAVID THOMPSON UNIVERSITY CENTRE

The launch of a collection of essays by West Kootenay author Tom Wayman on Tuesday, May 1 will feature readings and a musical performance to mark the 34th anniversary of the BC government’s shutdown  of Nelson’s David Thompson University Centre.

Joining Wayman for the “34 Years Later” event will be Vernon musician and author John Lent, a former instructor at DTUC’s predecessor institution, Notre Dame University of Nelson. NDU was closed in 1977.

The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. at Nelson’s Oxygen Art Centre. Admission is free ($5 donation appreciated) and the event is open to the public. Oxygen is located at 320 Vernon St. (alley entrance). Launched that evening will be a selection of Wayman’s essays and interviews 1994-2014, If You’re Not Free at Work, Where are You Free: Literature and Social Change, published by Toronto’s Guernica Editions. One essay in the collection celebrates Nelson’s dogged determination to host its own postsecondary institution.

“In 20th Century Canada only two postsecondary institutions were completely closed by governments, “Wayman said. “Both of these were in Nelson,” A former DTUC instructor, Wayman noted that DTUC, a consortium of the University of Victoria and Selkirk College, arose out of Nelson’s outrage at the closure of Notre Dame University.

“The latter was a local initiative as well,” Wayman said. “And after DTUC was shuttered on May 1,1984, the community in 1991 launched the Kootenay School of the Arts, the nation’s first municipally supported postsecondary venture.”

Wayman’s many books of fiction, poetry and nonfiction include a 2015 collection of short stories about the Slocan Valley, The Shadows We Mistake for Love. That collection won the 2016 Diamond Foundation Prize for Fiction.

Performing at “34 Years Later” will be John Lent on guitar accompanied by Vernon musician-educator Mark Nishihara on bass. Lent, whose musical career began as a folksinger in Nelson, is a long-time member of the Lent/Fraser/Wall blues and roots trio. He said his work with Nishihara returns him to the folk and folk-rock repertoire of his earliest days, and highlights as well more recent tunes. Lent’s considerable talent as a singer-songwriter was acknowledged last year when one of his newest compositions was a semifinalist in Nashville’s International Songwriters Competition, out of 16,000 entries. Lent will also be reading from his literary work at “34 Years Later.” His recent books include a 2009 poetry collection Cantilevered Songs and a 2012 novel, The Path to Ardroe, both from Thistledown Press. A new collection of poems, A Matins Flywheel, is forthcoming.

“34 Years Later” is sponsored by the Oxygen Art Centre and Nelson’s Elephant Mountain Literary Festival.

Elephant Mountain Literary Festival virtual box office opens

Tickets are now on sale for the 7th annual Elephant Mountain Literary Festival, July 12 – 15 in Nelson. There are pay-as-you-go and Gold Pass options as well as some free events, enabling Kootenay folks to meet notable Canadian writers and to celebrate our own.

Esi Edugyan & Steven Price

This year’s “Literary Couples” theme brings to Nelson accomplished, award-winning writers that just happen to be married to one another. Giller Prize-winning novelist Esi Edugyan (Half-Blood Blues) and novelist and poet Steven Price (By Gaslight) are joined by Stephen Reid (notorious as a writer and a bank robber) and multi-disciplinary, multi-award-winning author Susan Musgrave. These four appear at the Saturday Night Live! event at the Hume Hotel, which features an on-stage interview with Globe and Mail Western Arts Correspondent Marsha Lederman. Musgrave is also EMLF’s writer-in-residence; in addition to two days of one-on-one critiques with local writers, she will give a talk on the writing craft on Thursday night at the Nelson Library, with entrance by donation.

 

Also in the program is Friday’s Literary Craft Crawl, a micro-brewery tour in which local writers are paired with a craft beer at Torchlight, Backroads, and Savoy breweries for the perfect blend of literature and libation.

The free micro-brewery beer tastings are followed by the 100-Mile Opening Gala at the Hume Hotel, a ticketed event where NBC beers are paired with local writers Jordan Abel, Sean Arthur Joyce, and Rayya Liebich in an evening that has become a festival favourite.

Panel discussions on Saturday at the Chamber of Commerce in the old CPR station explore aspects of creativity, with panelists from across the creative spectrum.

Elephant Mountain Literary Festival is a project of the Kootenay Literary Society. For full information and tickets please visit emlfestival.com.

Nelson’s Elephant Mountain Literary Festival Announces Lineup for July 2018

Susan Musgrave and Stephen Reid reenact a classic Bonnie and Clyde shot.

Two internationally-renowned literary couples will share the spotlight at the 7th annual Elephant Mountain Literary Festival in Nelson, B.C. July 12 to 15.

“Any intimate relationship takes creativity to make it work,” said EMLF executive director Natasha Smith as she announced this year’s festival lineup. “What is the creative dynamic like when both partners in a relationship are also writers? How does that work? We thought it would be fascinating to find out.

Susan Musgrave has excelled in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, children’s literature, anthology editing and memoir. She teaches in the University of B.C. creative writing department’s Master of Fine Arts program, and in 2014 was awarded the $20,000 Matt Cohen Award for “a lifetime of distinguished work by a Canadian writer.”

Joining Musgrave at EMLF is her husband Stephen Reid, whose most recent collection of essays, A Crowbar in the Buddhist Garden: Writing from Prison, won the 2013 City of Victoria Butler Book Prize. He was released in 2015 after serving 18 years in prison for a 1999 Victoria bank robbery.

Victoria, B.C. novelists Esi Edugyan and Steven Price will also take the stage at this year’s EMLF. Edugyan’s 2011 Half-Blood Blues won the Giller Prize, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and the Governor General’s Award.  Her latest is the non-fiction Dreaming of Elsewhere: Observations on Home (2014). Steven Price’s 2016 novel Gaslight was longlisted for the Giller, and his poetry has won the 2007 Gerald Lampert Award and the 2013 ReLit Award.

Serving as the Holley Rubinsky Memorial writer-in-residence at this year’s EMLF is Susan Musgrave. Also in the schedule is a Friday afternoon pub crawl involving local emerging writers and three Nelson craft brew pubs, followed by the Friday opening night gala featuring West Kootenay authors paired with Nelson Brewing Company beers. Authors reading at the gala are Griffin Prize winner poet Jordan Abel from Castlegar, New Denver poet, novelist, historian and journalist Sean Arthur Joyce, and Nelson poet Rayya Liebich.

Saturday panels explore themes of creativity and include a crime fiction panel featuring West and East Kootenay mystery writers Dave Butler, Rachel Greenaway, Roz Nay and Judy Toews, moderated by Deryn Collier.


A selection of books by
2018 EMLF presenters:

Susan Musgrave

Nonfiction

You’re in Canada Now . . . (2005)
A Taste of Haida Gwaii: Food Gathering and Feasting at the Edge of the World (2015)

Poetry

When the World is not Our Home: Selected Poems 1985-2000 (2009)
Origami Dove (2011)

Fiction

Cargo of Orchids (2000)
Given (2012)

For Children

Love You More (2014)
More Blueberries! (2015)

Edited

Perfectly Secret (2004)
Force Field: 77 Women Poets of B.C. (2013)

Stephen Reid

Nonfiction

A Crowbar in the Buddhist Garden: Writing from Prison (2012)

Fiction

Jackrabbit Parole (1986)

 

Esi Edyugan:

Fiction

The Second Life of Samuel Tyne (2004)
Half Blood Blues (2011)

Nonfiction

Dreaming of Elsewhere: Observations on Home (2014)

Steven Price:

Poetry:
Anatomy of Keys (2006)
Into the Darkness (2011)
Omens in the Year of the Ox (2012)

Fiction
By Gaslight (Penguin Random House 2016)

Jordan Abel:

Poetry:

The Place of Scraps (2013)
Un/inhabited (2015)
Injun (2016)

Sean Arthur Joyce:

Nonfiction:

A Perfect Childhood: One Hundred Years of Heritage Homes in Nelson (1997)
Hanging Fire & Heavy Horses: A History of Public Transit in Nelson (2000)
Laying the Children’s Ghosts to Rest: Canada’s Home Children in the West (2014)

Poetry:

The Charlatans of Paradise (2005)
Star Seeds( 2009)
The Price of Transcendence( 2015)

 

A Legacy of Words: remembering Holley Rubinsky

by Anne DeGrace
This article appeared in the fall 2015 issue of ARTiculate Magazine. Each year the Elephant Mountain Literary Festival offers the Holley Rubinsky Memorial Blue Pencil Sessions, this year with Writer-in-Residence Susan Musgrave.

BanffPublishingWorkshop

L – R: Richard Lemm, Alistair MacLeod, Holley Rubinsky, Sandra Birdsell at the Banff Publishing Workshop c. 1982.

In Holley Rubinsky’s 2006 novel Beyond This Point, five women find their way to the Kaslo-like town of Ruth during forest fire season.

Holley passed away in Kaslo from cancer on August 1, and in the smoky weeks that followed I thought about the novel, and I thought about Holley. As word spread in the writing community, I suspect that a lot of people were thinking about the fire that was Holley: in her writing, her energy and enthusiasm, her generosity, and her legendary straightforwardness.

In her four published books of fiction Holley displayed a talent for describing complex ideas with a remarkable economy of words. Her style was sophisticated, insightful, sharply drawn and starkly rendered. Her stories could be humorous, difficult, dark, and unforgettable.

Holley moved from California to Kaslo with her daughter Robin in 1976. By then she had won the Samuel Goldwyn Creative Writing Award, acquired a Master’s degree in education and earned her pilot’s license. In Kaslo she taught elementary school and became entrenched in the community. And she wrote.

Attending the Banff Publishing Workshop (BPW) in the early 80s, Holley rubbed shoulders with literary luminaries including Alistair MacLeod, Sandra Birdsell, and W.O. Mitchell. It was there that she met and fell in love with BPW founder Yuri Rubinsky; they married in 1984. And she became friends with Douglas Gibson, who with McClelland & Stewart would publish Beyond This Point 30 years later.

BPW “changed the face of Canadian publishing” explains Doug. “Yuri lured us all out there, where the mountains had an extraordinary effect of everyone. Just as it was wonderful to see Yuri in action, it was even more wonderful to see Yuri and Holley in action. They were wonderfully well suited, and it was exciting to be around them.”

They settled in Toronto, where Holley went on to win the National Magazine Award, the Foundation Award for Fiction, and the Journey Prize for her short story “Rapid Transits,” which became the title story in a collection published by Polestar in 1991. At First I Hope for Rescue (Knopf 1997) was nominated for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize.

After Yuri’s untimely death, which Holley drew upon for Beyond This Point, she moved to Arizona. There she gathered the characters and setting that would inform South of Elfrida, published by Brindle & Glass in 2013. But the mountains called, and Holley returned to Kaslo where she found new ways to embrace the literary life.

Holley hosted The Writers’ Show on Kootenay Co-op Radio from 2006 to 2008, interviewing writers and publishing insiders. The list is a who’s who of literary notables, including George Bowering, John Vaillant, Angie Abdou, and Kathy Page. She hosted writing retreats at her Kaslo home, offering support, mentorship and critique, drawing gratitude and occasionally blood; Holley said what she thought. Linda Crosfield describes Holley’s retreats:

“A typical retreat consisted of five or six writers working manuscripts. We’d meet in the morning around her big oak table, share a little of our work and talk about what we planned to do over the next few days. Then we’d go to our various work places and have at it. At the end of the day we’d wind up in her kitchen, put together a communal meal, and unwind over a glass of something,” says Linda, adding that Holley was “an insightful editor and a tireless supporter of emerging writers.”

Holley worked with Mandy Bath on her memoir Disaster in Paradise. “Holley was an exacting and inspiring teacher. Her advice was clear, blunt and sometimes hard to take, but always worth following,” she says. “Our collaboration over more than two years marked one of the most fulfilling periods of my life.”

Author Rita Moir taught writing workshops with Holley, who, she says, “was as brutal with her own work as she was with others. Holley was also exuberant, full of piss and vinegar, generous, always inventing new ways to survive. She was curious, a sprite, a vixen, a hag. I mean that in all the fullness of those terms, for the best and the worst.”

If Holley demanded the best in others, she expected the best in herself. Unhappy with the published version of Beyond This Point, she reworked and self-published her own limited edition version, Weight of the Bear. Self-critical as she may have been, her work drew praise. The Globe and Mail called her writing “incendiary.”

“As with all her writing, Holley was fearless about her material and about showing the prickly, mean and miserable side of humanity,” says author Caroline Woodward. “It takes courage to write with such depth about darkness the way she did and with such clear-eyed compassion for each and every character.”

“I was struck by Holley’s fierceness in arguing for good writing,” says poet Jane Byers, and Holley will be remembered for championing the written word.

It was important to Holley that literary mentorship and critique continue. And so, thanks to a generous bequest, Nelson’s Elephant Mountain Literary Festival will host a Holley Rubinsky blue pencil intensive workshop with an established writer in 2016.

The legacy of a writer lies in the words she leaves behind. In Holley’s case, the legacy can be found not only in her own words, but also in the words she drew from others, sometimes gently, sometimes kicking and screaming, demanding always that the work be the very best. And that’s a legacy indeed.

Holley Rubinsky bibliography:

South of Elfrida (Brindle & Glass 2013)
Weight of the Bear (self-published limited edition, 2008; a shortened and edited version of Beyond This Point.)
Beyond This Point (McClelland & Stewart, 2006)
At First I Hope for Rescue (Knopf Canada, 1997; Picador (USA), 1998)
Rapid Transits and Other Stories (Polestar Press, 1990)